Engineering Missionaries International

Their website says:
"Engineering Ministries International (eMi) is a non-profit Christian development organization made up of architects, engineers and design professionals who donate their skills to help children and families around the world step out of poverty and into a world of hope
".
What this means is that professionals in the design, architecture and construction field have realised that their skills can benefit other people and ensure that good ideas and intentions can be carried out with a cost effective and correctly designed and planned structure.

They were working in Uganda on a larger project in Jinja town and met us in 2004 to review our very bad drawings for a new health centre. John Sauder and later, Chad Gamble, went away and came back with full AutoCad architectural sketches with dimensions, cut away of walls, specifications for roof construction and even plans for the latrines and soakpit. Before EMI invest their time and skills they have the understandable need to be convinced that you can fund and complete their planned construction in the coming weeks or months and, as noted on their application form, that:

+ The project ministers to the needs of the poor.

+ There is a direct and ongoing proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

+ The property on which the project is to be built is owned by the ministry

+ There is a planned method of funding project construction and operation.

Our landlord in Lukuli is the Church of Uganda who recognised the services we provide to the community, however we equally serve the Born Again churches, the Catholics and the Muslim groups around us. In Uganda the various Christian branches of the church are treated as separate entities anyway. Our staff revert to the spiritual strength felt by our patients during sickness and particularly for the HIV counselling and testing services and Care and Support to those living with HIV/AIDS.

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